March

Leviticus 19:18 calls us to love our neighbors as ourselves. If we did so, the world would be a beautiful, harmonious place. Our country is trying to move towards that, despite recent media depictions of a race war.

Catechism # 1825, 2447 discusses racism.

“Every form off social or cultural discrimination in fundamental personal rights on the grounds of sex, race, color, social conditions, language, or religion must be curbed and eradicated as incompatible with God’s design. (Gaudium et spes 29, section 2)Every form of social or cultural discrimination in fundamental personal rights on the grounds of sex, race, color, social conditions, language, or religion must be curbed and eradicated as incompatible with God’s design. (Gaudium et spes 29, section 2)”

The Bible make it very clear in a popular story: The Good Samaritan of Luke 10.The Samaritans and Jews did not get along. Samaritans were looked down on as unclean. However, when the man found himself beaten and robbed, he found himself to be too unclean for the Levi and Priest to touch him. The Samaritan was there to show humility and love towards his fellow man. He learned a valuable lesson that day about prejudiced thoughts. The man who was least likely to help him helped him more than the most elite of his own people. We are to love all men as our brothers; race is simply a hue. God dwells in all of us and we are all made in his image. We should never mistreat one of God’s children because they are darker or lighter than you. This should not even be an issue, but unfortunately it is. All of us have a heart and we can either fill it with compassion or hate.

The Samaritan also had to learn not to prejudge the Jewish man. He faced oppression from the Jewish people as a whole, but he saw him as a man in need instead of a statistic or part of an institution.

True progress can be made when we see each other as a child of God and descendant of Abraham rather than a statistic, stereotype, or a threat.

Our Lord and Savior was born to a young Jewish woman. He came here in humble form. You cannot claim to love him if you hate others who look like him.

On this anniversary of the March on Washington, celebrate the progress, and remember the dream. Our parents marched so we can walk free. Free from oppression. Free from hate. Free from preconceived notions. That is true freedom.  When we work together, the dream can become a reality.

 

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